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Express Entry: Eligibility to apply as a Federal Skilled Worker

Minimum requirements

To be eligible, you must meet all the minimum requirements for:

  • skilled work experience
  • language ability
  • education

If you meet all the minimum requirements, we’ll assess your application based on additional selection factors.

Skilled work experience

Skilled work experience means that you’ve worked in 1 of these National Occupational Classification (NOC) TEER categories:

  • TEER 0
  • TEER 1
  • TEER 2
  • TEER 3

You must show that while working in your primary occupation, you performed the duties set out in the lead statement of the occupational description in the NOC. This includes all the essential duties and most of the main duties listed.

Your skilled work experience must be

  • in the same type of job (have the same NOC) as the job you want to use for your immigration application (called your primary occupation)
  • within the last 10 years
  • paid work (have been paid wages or earned commission—volunteer work or unpaid internships don’t count)
  • at least 1 year of continuous work or 1,560 hours total (30 hours per week)—you can meet this in a few different ways:
    • full-time at 1 job: 30 hours/week for 12 months = 1 year full-time (1,560 hours)
    • equal amount in part-time work: for example 15 hours/week for 24 months = 1 year full time (1,560 hours)
      • You can work as many part-time jobs as you need to meet this requirement
    • full-time at more than 1 job: 30 hours/week for 12 months at more than 1 job = 1 year full time (1,560 hours)

Part-time work experience

Your skilled work experience must be paid work including paid wages or earned commission. We don’t count volunteer work or unpaid internships.

For part-time work, you can work more or less than 15 hours/week as long as it adds up to 1,560 hours. You can work more than 1 part-time job to get the hours you need to apply.

We don’t count any hours you work above 30 hours/week.

Student work experience

Work experience gained while you were studying may count towards your minimum requirements if the work:

Language ability

You must

Your language tests are valid for 2 years after the date of the test result. They must be valid on the day you apply for permanent residence.

Education

If you went to school in Canada, you must have a certificate, diploma or degree from a Canadian

  • secondary institution (high school) or
  • post-secondary institution

If you have foreign education, you must have

Selection factors

If you meet all the minimum requirements, we’ll assess your eligibility for the Federal Skilled Worker Program based on:

  • age
  • education
  • work experience
  • whether you have a valid job offer
  • English or French language skills
  • adaptability (how well you’re likely to settle here)

Based on how well you do in each of the 6 factors, we’ll assign you an overall score out of 100.

The current pass mark is 67 points.

These points are different from the points we use to rank your profile in the Express Entry pool.

How we use selection factor points

We use selection factor points to assess if you’re eligible for the Federal Skilled Worker Program.

Once you’re in the Express Entry pool, we use a different system to rank your profile. We select the highest-ranking candidates from the pool and invite them to apply for permanent residence.

Proof of funds

You must show that you have enough money for you and your family to settle in Canada, unless you

Admissibility

You must be admissible to Canada.

Where you can live in Canada

You must plan to live outside the province of Quebec. The province of Quebec selects its own skilled workers. If you plan on living in Quebec, see Quebec-selected skilled workers for more information.

When you fill out your profile, we’ll ask you where you plan to live in Canada. You don’t have to settle in that province or territory.

If you’re a Provincial Nominee, you must settle in the province or territory that nominated you.

Next steps

lf-employment is the state of working for oneself rather than an employer.

Generally, tax authorities will view a person as self-employed if the person chooses to be recognized as such, or is generating income such that the person is required to file a tax return under legislation in the relevant jurisdiction. In the real world, the critical issue for the taxing authorities is not that the person is trading but is whether the person is profitable and hence potentially taxable. In other words, the activity of trading is likely to be ignored if no profit is present, so occasional and hobby- or enthusiast-based economic activity is generally ignored by authorities.

Self-employed people generally find their own work rather than being provided with work by an employer, earning income from a trade or business that they operate.

In some countries governments (the United States and United Kingdom, for example) are placing more emphasis on clarifying whether an individual is self-employed or engaged in disguised employment, often described as the pretense of a contractual intra-business relationship to hide what is otherwise a simple employer-employee relationship.

Although the common perception is that self-employment is concentrated in a few service sector industries, like sales people and insurance agents, research by the Small Business Administration has shown that self-employment occurs across a wide segment of the U.S. economy.Furthermore, industries that are not commonly associated as a natural fit for self-employment, such as manufacturing, have in fact been shown to have a large proportion of self-employed individuals and home-based businesses.

In the United States, any person is considered self-employed for tax purposes if that person is running a business as a sole proprietorship, independent contractor, as a member of a partnership, or as a member of a limited liability company that does not elect to be treated as a corporation. In addition to income taxes, these individuals must pay Social Security and Medicare taxes in the form of a SECA (Self-Employment Contributions Act) tax.

Source : https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/immigrate-canada/express-entry/eligibility/federal-skilled-workers.html

As seen on 10/09/2023

Please visit https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/immigrate-canada.html for latest updates